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Joke of the Day

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2022-08-17 6:50 AM

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Back Again :)

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Quitting again! Anyone else?

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2022-08-06 3:17 PM

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Alcohol and Nutrient Deficiencies

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2022-08-03 5:46 PM

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12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
Mouth Ulcers (Canker Sores in US English?)

Firstly I´d just like to say what a great resource my wife and I have found this site to be. We tend to read rather than post but its so encouraging to find such a wealth of information in one place - a really invaluable tool for anyone who is serious about quitting.
Having both made it through "Hell Week" and "Heck Week" and now into our 4th week I´m finding I´m developing more and more mouth ulcers. I´ve consulted my doctor about it and he has assured me it is nothing out of the ordinary and prescribed me some medication that in terms of pain, is like applying battery acid to the affected areas.
I´ve Googled this quite a lot and I realise that this is not a totally uncommon side effect of quitting smoking, but what amazed me is that some people have actually resorted to smoking occasional cigars in an effort to keep the sores at bay. I´m wondering if anyone else has come across this problem and if so, if any miracle remedy is available out there. 

Giving up smoking is tough. Being unable to reward yourself because your car is in the mechanics for the 3rd time in 2 months is a pig as well. (Really, I suspect I´m single-handedly putting his kids through college.) But not even being able to enjoy a cup of tea and a biscuit after a long day is just really dragging me down. After 20 years of starting the day on Coffee and 5 cigarettes, I can´t tell you how much I need breakfast to get me going in the morning these days, and now a piece of toast feels like I´m eating razor blades.

Does anyone have any advice for a very grumpy, very poor, but most of all, very hungry ex smoker?

Regards

Steve 


12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
Mouth Ulcers (Canker Sores in US English?)

Thanks all,

I´m finding that its sugary foods that are causing me the most discomfort - so things like lollipops, boiled sweets etc are not an option to take my mind off smoking. I´m formulating my own theory on what the root cause of all this is and I´ve put together the following:

 

Every night I´m waking up with an incredibly dry mouth, to the extent that I´m taking a 1 litre bottle of water to bed with me. In the past, having been a relatively heavy smoker (30 - 40 a day for the last 20 years), the poisons contained in the cigarette smoke have ensured that any bacteria in my mouth were fried almost immediately. Now however, I´m back to relying on the enzymes and antibacteria which naturally occur in saliva doing the job for me (as well as practising good dental hygiene). I´m also avoiding alcohol like the plague at the moment as I know that that, by far is the biggest trigger for me. I think sailors started drinking rum to avoid things like scurvy didn´t they? Well without the cigarette smoke, alcohol etc I´m suddenly asking an awful lot of my saliva, so until some natural balance is restored I just have to live with it, and floss, brush and rinse like a nutter.

I realise its probably a preposterous theory, no doubt there´s a dental hygienist out there s******ing away to themself, but its working for me and helps me to convince myself it’s all part of the healing process! I probably should mention that as a result of an accident a few years back I wear a prosthetic front tooth which is fitted to a plate that clips against two teeth and sits on the roof of my mouth. I mean it’s a harbour for nasty things. I´m hoping to get an implant in the future with the money I save from not smoking, but as I mentioned before, first I have to put my mechanic´s kids through college. lol

Again, thanks for your encouragement and suggestions and fear not - I´ve no intention of trying the cigar remedy! My apologies for venting off a bit with my first post. A lot of accumulated frustration really; cars breaking down, additional bills to pay as a result, no noticeable difference in cash flow despite all the effort, no rewards and a painful mouth. I can see the bright side though – I´m losing a couple of pounds every week as I´m not eating much, so unwanted weight gain isn´t an issue for me J

 

The very best to you all,

 

 

Steve


My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 22
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 770
Amount Saved: �115.50
Life Gained:
Days: 3 Hrs: 4 Mins: 49 Seconds: 35

12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
Scruffy's on board

Hi Scruffy,

 

Congratulations on your progress so far, I’m only a few days in front of you so I can totally empathise with what you’re going through. I’m 37 and have been smoking since I was 14. In the last 10 years I went from smoking around 20 a day up to about 35 - 40. The increase is attributable to the fact that I moved from London to Madrid and in Spain, smoking is the national sport! I was one of those people that smoked 3 or 4 before leaving the house in the morning, another 2 or 3 in the car on the 45 minute drive to work, 2 or 3 before bed in the evening - a real junkie. The extent to which I was addicted was absurd. We live out in the country now and I’ve lost count of the times I’ve had to go out at 1am in the morning to find a petrol station selling cigarettes, just to ensure I had enough to smoke the following morning. The thought of a life without cigarettes terrified me, to some extent it still does but everyday is getting easier. 

I found the first few days I’d get like a watery feeling in my mouth and a pang in my stomach, that was me craving nicotine and I just did anything to take my mind off it - some sit-ups, running up and down the stairs a few times, gulp some water, anything. Hell Week was just that, absolute hell, not just for me but for everyone around me. We have 3 young kids at home, all boys; Alex 6, Samuel 4 and Baby Jamie will be 1 year old next Sunday. The option of sleeping through the first week just wasn’t available to me. I work mornings 8am - 3pm and my wife is an adult education teacher and works 4pm - 10pm. So the afternoons for me are always hectic; nappies, making dinners, baths and finally getting everyone into bed. It would have been so easy for me to say "I’m stressed - I need a smoke" but the truth is, in the moments I felt like that I would read a few threads on the forum and the urge would pass. And interestingly, for everyone that "slips" because of stress, someone else "slips" because of boredom - in the end we’re looking for excuses.

Things improved dramatically in Heck Week. The physical dependence subsided but the psychological side of smoking was still there. A feeling of being a bit lost, or a sensation of "Something’s not quite right, something’s missing" but anyway, I went from thinking about smoking every 2 minutes to thinking about it every 10 or 15 minutes. At the end of Heck Week I went for a 10km run. A month ago I couldn’t have run up the stairs without gasping for breath and bordering on the point of vomiting. That was a real achievement for me - I could feel the fresh air filling my lungs for the first time in decades and I felt good, I mean really good.

And now I’m in my 4th week. I’m taking nothing for granted, and I am working at it all the time. But everyday really is getting easier for me. I go hours now without thinking about smoking. I get out of bed and my first thought is no longer "Another sodding day without a smoke" its more "I’m starving, what can I have for brekkie!” I certainly have more energy than I´ve had in a long, long time.

My boss is Argentinean (although he’s been in Spain 30 years) and he’s being really supportive actually. He was telling me that when he quit in 1985 it was so hard for him. Everyone smoked in the work place, in cinemas, on the metro, buses, banks etc. He’s hasn’t smoked in 25 years but even now when he’s enjoyed a good meal, has a glass of red in his hand, he still craves a cigarette - I’m under no illusions - this is going to be something I’ll have to fight the rest of my life. But better than fighting for my life because of some awful tobacco related illness! And really, think how much easier we have it compared with our predecessors; smoking is prohibited in so many places now. I can quite literally go whole weeks without having to smell even a whiff of smoke. 

I read a good post by RSFire (who I must admit I find myself rooting for and checking his progress) and it was about this idea that on giving up smoking, you’d somehow be able to press the reset button and it would be as though you had never smoked. And of course the realisation and disappointment that it just doesn’t work like that. And this is why for me this site is so invaluable. The combined experiences of hundreds of others, the support if needed and the encouragement. One particularly poignant thing that worked for me was Samantha’s quit video. As a parent it really did strike a chord with me and it still makes my wife cry every time we watch it. If you’re even tempted to try a puff, just watch that You Tube clip and imagine your own little ones as lost as that wee lad.

I’ve rambled on a bit much! (Quiet morning at work). We might be hundreds of miles apart and it’s very unlikely we’ll ever meet, but I’m cheering for you, and wishing you every success!

 

All the best

 

 

Steve 


My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 24
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 840
Amount Saved: �126.00
Life Gained:
Days: 3 Hrs: 10 Mins: 41 Seconds: 23

12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
Starting Over

You´re doing superbly well! Don´t beat yourself up about past efforts, it is a waste of time - just stay focussed on this quit.

I can tell from your other posts that your putting so much effort into this. You´ve done your research and you´re prepared. Getting the first 7 days under your belt is going to be a real milestone. Let´s be honest, the first week is a real pig, but if you can crack that then you´re well on your way. 
I promise you the second week is easier (I´m only on my 4th week so its still fresh in my mind). Sounds like you have your weekend pretty well thought out which is a good move. 

Nothing would make me happier than to arrive at work Monday morning and see you´ve completed "Hell Week".

Regards,


Steve

My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 25
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 875
Amount Saved: �131.25
Life Gained:
Days: 3 Hrs: 15 Mins: 8 Seconds: 21

12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
RELAPSE TRAPS

Take it one day at a time Machiavelli! Its a bit like the old British maxim "Look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves" - if you just focus on the days, the weeks and months will soon add up for you. The cash saved will add up as well, so will your life expectancy - a win win situation however you look at it!

Very best of luck to you,


Steve


My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 26
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 910
Amount Saved: �136.50
Life Gained:
Days: 3 Hrs: 17 Mins: 20 Seconds: 47

12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
It is 90 days today!!!

Congratulations!

And look at the cash you have saved! Money that would literally have gone up in smoke. I hope you find time to treat yourself to something very, very special, you deserve it :)

Well done!

Steve

My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 28
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 980
Amount Saved: �147.00
Life Gained:
Days: 3 Hrs: 23 Mins: 44 Seconds: 38

12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
Starting Over

Not only was the rush hour traffic into the centre of Madrid less conjested than normal, but RSWFire made it through "hell week"! I´m chuffed to bits for you - the first weekend is particularly tough I think. Looks like this could be a good week :)

Congratulations to you. You are officially a Top Banana.

Steve



My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 28
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 980
Amount Saved: �147.00
Life Gained:
Days: 3 Hrs: 23 Mins: 46 Seconds: 15

12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
About the Stats

I´d gladly sign up for that. 

As I tried to convey on the deleted post, it wasn´t a lack of enthusiasm, it was a lack of awareness. 

Count me in.

Regards

Steve.

My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 28
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 980
Amount Saved: �147.00
Life Gained:
Days: 4 Hrs: 0 Mins: 22 Seconds: 10

12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
Starting Over

RSW, we all know just how bleak those first few weeks are. All I can tell you is that it does get better, if it didn´t nobody would ever quit! As Bugger says, you really need to try and focus on the positives, which i appreciate is easier said than done but how about in your case: 

If you´re 32, and smoked for 16 years, we can assume that there were 16 years you didn´t smoke. 832 smoking weeks, and now 833 smoke free! 

I have to wait until 2018 before I can say "I´ve smoked less than half my life". lol

I spent most of the second week of my quit contemplating just how much additional income the governement would generate out of me if I continued to smoke for another 40 years and how much state pension I was likely to lose by dying 10 years earlier through a smoking related disease. I imagined all these politicians and treasury bean counters rubbing their hands gleefully at my foolishness. You just have to find something that works for you. I mean, you know deep down what a mug´s game it is anyway.

I know you can do this. See how you´re feeling at the end of week 2, I´m sure there will be a marked improvement.

All the very best,


Steve

My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 29
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 1,015
Amount Saved: �152.25
Life Gained:
Days: 4 Hrs: 4 Mins: 26 Seconds: 56

12 years ago 0 orinoco 19 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
Starting Over

I understand exactly where you´re coming from. The first week you can kind of trick yourself into getting through it, its all a temporary situation, you sleep as much as you can etc. The second week is the realisation that its actually over for good, quite hard work and not a great deal of fun. Now you have to decide whether you´re in it for the long slog, or whether you cave in.

You start analysing the pros and cons of quitting. You´ve saved some cash, but you´re miserable. You don´t feel like Superman all of a sudden either, which is a smidge disappointing. I think its very easy to lose sight of why you were giving up in the first place in the second week which is why I imagine they place so much emphasis on preparation here. Its now that you need a reminder of what your goals were - kicking the smoker´s cough, the smell of your clothes, the rewards you were going to have. Stuff you wrote down when you were sound of mind prior to quitting.

If you did any of that, go back and have a look at it. If not, don´t worry. I can tell you from experience that were you to light up a smoke now it wouldn´t taste half as good as you thought it was going to, which is the first kick in the teeth. Added to that you have the feeling of disappointment that you´ve let yourself down again, and that now you´re going to have to go through another week of grief just to get back to the point you were half an hour ago. What´s more you´d probably buy a pack of smokes, and even though the first one was revolting you´d smoke 5 more in pretty quick succesion, you´ll have a headache, your hands will tremble and your eyes that were just starting to look pretty clear and sparkly are already looking like a road map again.

Its just so not worth it. Do anything but light up. Buy yourself a Happy Meal instead, the craving will pass. As I said, it does get easier, and I´ve no reason at all to lie about that.

You can do this, I know you can.

Regards
Steve

 

My Milage:

My Quit Date: 8/24/2009
Smoke-Free Days: 29
Cigarettes Not Smoked: 1,015
Amount Saved: �152.25
Life Gained:
Days: 4 Hrs: 4 Mins: 35 Seconds: 14