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question about anxious thoughts


sweatbee
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10 years ago 0 sweatbee 122 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
 
 
   Hi Mich991
 
 
 
 
     I wanted to tell you about my experience with scary thoughts: The first year or two of having panic& anxiety
     attacks I remember having the scary anxious thoughts, it was really bad at night( my husband was working 3rd shift at the
     time), I would be home alone with my daughter who was little at the time. When it was time for bed I would lay
     their and the thoughts would start to race! What if I run out of the house and beat on the neighbors door! or run out
     into traffic! what if I hurt my daughter while sleep walking! this went on until I would whined  up having a massive
    panic attack!  This went on every time my husband worked 3rd( I didn't do it when he was home)!!  So one night
    the same routine started and I remember being tired, well as the thoughts started as I lay their I stretched my arms
    out and said out loud OK if it's going to happen let it happen now!  Well after about 5 minutes went by  I said out
    loud well I guess theirs my answer nothing happened!!!!!  I realized it was just Fear!!! Fear and worry that I would'nt
    have control.  After that I did exactly what CadenMcCullem wrote I would just let the thoughts float in and right back
   out telling myself that their just thoughts. And they did go away!!  I think because I took the power out of the fear.
   I hope this helps to here.
 
cadenmccallum
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10 years ago 0 cadenmccallum 180 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
 
Hi Ya mich991:
 
I like you at times have these terrifying thoughts and wrack my brain trying to figure out what is wrong with me, why am I thinking about this, am I going crazy?  You know what we are not going crazy, we are just extremely anxious and/or panicky and people like us can have thoughts like these.  Having said that I have been reading about the subject of obsessive scary thoughts and the more power we give the thought the more it intensifies it's hold on us to the point where we can get a pa.  The best thing to do is don't pay any attention to the thought (s) but just let them float away.  Recgonize them for what they are just thoughts, we would never act on them because just thinking about them frightens the wits out of us. 
 
I can recommend a really good book written by a panic attack survivor - yes I said survivor.  It's called "At Last A Life" by Paul David in it he clearly states the worst thing we can do is try fighting the thought - we will lose.  You will find answers to a lot of questions and hopefully it will lead you to your road of recovery.
 
Take care
Breanne- Bilingual Health Educator
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mich991,
 
I would suggest re-reading the first 3 parts of section 4: Exposure work. As you know, these sections discuss learned fear and how one responds to fear. Perhaps once you feel more comfortable with these concepts, then you could move on to the exposure work. If not, I would go over section 3: Challenging Negativity.
 
Below are ten questions you may find helpful in challenging your anxious thoughts. When you have an anxious thought, for example when you feel like you may pass out or die, answer some of these 10 questions:

1. Is it "true"?
2. How do I know it’s true?
3. Is it 100% true? (remember something that is 75% or 99% true is  
    not 100% true)
4. What's the evidence for it being true?
5. What’s the evidence against it being true?
6. Has it ever happened before?
7. What's different now?
8. If it were true, how bad would it really be?
9. What's the worst thing that could happen?
10. If the worst thing happened, how bad would it really be?

I would not suggest skipping this section, however, the choice is of course yours.
Members, do you have any advice or suggestions? How have you found the Exposure Work section of the program?
 
Breanne, Bilingual Health Educator
Brandie
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10 years ago 0 Brandie 52 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
I sort of wondered that too mich991. I expose myself everyday to going places. I don't always like it, but I do it. I usually feel extremely tired or dizzy when I go in the store, but I do that anyways knowing nothing will really happen to me. But I did kind of wonder about the "am I gonna die" part of it.
mich991
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10 years ago 0 mich991 18 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Hello,
 
I have been working through the program and I am now at the exposure work section. I am a person who is very anxious about my mental i.e. I am scared I am going to turn into a mass murderer or that I am going to one day want to hurt myself or others. I am also anxious about my physical health sometimes i.e. passing out or dying. My quesiton is how does the exposure work portion of the program apply to people like myself because we obviously can't expose ourselves to the above mentioned situations? Do we just skip over that section or is there another form of exposure work for people like me with fears like I have mentioned. If someone could let me know that would be great! I really hope to get these thoughts out of my mind because they really do make me anxious and throw me into panic attacks. Thanks in advance!
Breanne- Bilingual Health Educator
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Bre,
 
Try to take some time out of your day to relax. Whether it be closing your eyes for 5 minutes and thinking about all of the positive things in your life, or taking a hot bath, cooking a healthy meal, or a taking quick walk around the block...make some time for yourself!
Members, how do you make time for yourselves?
 
Breanne, Bilingual Health Educator
Lorikb
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10 years ago 0 Lorikb 7 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Thanks so much for the replies.

I've had just about everything checked out at my doctor for my own piece of mind. Maybe next time I will ask specifically how anxiety could lead to my various aches and pains. I know my heartburn gets worse when I am on edge which is one of those endless cycles.

I also know I don't take care of myself, eat well/exercise, as well as I should. A lot of that has to do with me just not feeling good due to being so stressed out so I am sure that contributes as well.

Bre
Brandie
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10 years ago 0 Brandie 52 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Ashley, You are exactly right. My counsler told me why you get the pains in your kidneys, the chest pains and all the others. When your anxious your body puts off sort of like a gas that goes throughout your body, thus creating pain just about everywhere. From what I read, I think the adrenal glands on your kidneys have something to do with it. Once I knew what was causing the pain I felt better. I still get the gas pains around my heart area. That is what is most scary. They come and go, but only last a second or two at most. Just under my left breast. My dad has the same thing and he had his heart checked and was fine. They told him it was problably gas and nerves. I had constant gallbladder pain my whole pregnancy and after my baby was born. But what is funny is that I don't even notice that pain now that I have become an anxious person. Before my anxiety problem I worried constantly about that pain. Seems kind of funny that pain is gone now. Like you said mind over matter. I got all the other pains which make me worry about worst case scenarios and the gallbladder pain is gone!!
Ashley -> Health Educator
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Brelaine welcome!  We are all here to help.
Creativity and intelligence is often common in people with anxiety disorders.  They are so intelligent and creative they make up horrible, elaborate stories in their head and then worry about them!
 
Pain often accompanies panic as panic is very hard on the body, normally causing strain and even pain in the chest, muscles and other areas of the body.
 
It sounds like you are feeling pain and then panic however...  Have you thought about talking to your doctor?  Tell him about some of the pains you are having.  He will most likely be able to reassure you and give you reasons why you are feeling the pain.  You can write what he says down and look at this information when you are feeling anxious. 
 
Also, some of your pain could be psychosomatic.  Because you are thinking about pain so often you are creating the pain.  Sort of the opposite of a placebo effect.  Mind over matter.  Sometimes realizing that you have control over how you feel makes a big difference.  I know its much easier said then done...  Try distracting yourself, try relaxation techniques and keep using the program. Stay strong we are all here for you.
 
Any other suggestions from members?
 
 
 
Ashley, Health Educator
Brandie
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10 years ago 0 Brandie 52 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
I'm relatively new to anxiety (since dec 26 of this year). I think you will find, you are so not alone with this. I could not put the anxious thoughts out of my mind. They would go away and would come back. I always thought the worst. You know........my heart, my brain, etc.  I still have them occasionally during the day but overall they are so much better. And when I do have them, I can control my anxiety a little better now than before. Almost all my symptoms have went away except for the little bit of dizziness that comes and goes, which I think has something to do with what I eat and drink. Don't give up, something will work for you. I started Paxil about 2-1/2 weeks ago, and I think it is really helping.

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