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What are negative core beliefs?

Ashley -> Health Educator

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What have you learned?


a month ago +1 11226 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1

Bump!

11 years ago +1 186 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1
Great responses.We do learn so much when we take on any struggle.
I will share a simple but very important one as there are so many.
I have learned that I Can
N.O.P.E.
Sherry
11 years ago +1 1140 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1
What have I learned? Hmm.
 
1) That an addict can not simply dabble with his/her addictive substance without relapsing any more than one can make a winning deal with the devil. You play with fire, and you will get burned. I didn't want to believe that for a long time. Some days, I still don't like the idea.
 
2) That the physical cravings will stop within 3 days of your last nicotine intake. This was one of the most important things for me. Before I knew that, I couldn't imagine spending the rest of my life without cigarettes. I thought I would have all that anxiety and intense cravings for the rest of my life. I was also contemplating staying on NRT's for the rest of my life. So happy to have learned that I was wrong on that one. If I had known that before, I think I would have quit years earlier.
 
3) That I don't have to run and hide from the health educators.  They are here to help and not to judge.
 
I'm sure there is a lot more, but that's all I've got for now.
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11 years ago +1 2778 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1
Hey Ashley!!!
 
    Another great question that definitely deserves a response!  I have learned so much here about my addiction... how and why it started, why I continued to smoke, why I wanted to quit (sort of) and why I definitely wanted my forever quit!  I also learned how to quit and remain smoke-free!
 
    The most important think I have learned is that I could not have quit unless I wanted my quit more than I have ever wanted anything! To achieve my goal, I had to crave  my quit!  Once that was in place, I found the right NRT and means of support and distraction here at the SSC.  Once I found the SSC, I gaind my freedom and the learning never stopped!
 
     I would end up writing a dissertation if I wrote down everything I have learned since my first day here... almost 5 years ago to the day, but I would hate for y'all to bang your heads on your keyboard on that final nod of your head! z z z z z z z     So, I won't bore you now with a lot of details, but I will tell you that I am so happy to have found this site and all of my fellow quit buddies here!
 
     Have a great smoke-free weekend!!!   CLINK!!! 
 
                  Jim
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11 years ago +1 816 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1
Hello Ashley  What I've learned with not having smoked for a few days is that I'm still like the newbie and that is that I'm one smoke away from a pack a day just like anyone else. Don't get me wrong in that I'm quite removed from the situation only the same rules apply whether we're one day smoke free or ten years. Today I don't even like the smell of it anymore. I think the nature of addiction is round and comes full circle which would probably help to explain why most people try from 5 to 7 times before they can finally stop for any length of time. For the newbie or anyone else I'd say stop and think very hard before thinking about taking that first puff. I didn't realise before coming to the SSC that people were actually not smoking and seemed to be happy about it. Every quit is different and what works for me may not work for anyone else. It's whatever works for the individual. There has been a lot of baby steps in my quit because I would never have thought in a million years that I'd ever be a non-smoker. Stranger things have happened I guess ? Excellent for you for not smoking today. breather
11 years ago +1 11226 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1
Quitting smoking is a journey. The farther along in your quit you get the more you learn and grow.  The SSC teaches members important aspects of the quit in the program and the support group allows members to share what they have learned with others; so let’s do a little more sharing…

Since you first joined the site how have you grown and what have you learned? It doesn’t matter whether you have joined the site last week of last year, please share.


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