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Hiring process; disclosure;Dealing with references


Gwendle
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10 months ago 0 Gwendle 2 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Hi Coppersky,
 
Could you ask those workplaces to provide you with a reference letter rather than leaving it up to a phone call or email? That way you would know what it said, and could decide whether to use it or not, or at least know whether you needed to explain absences that they're telling the new places about. 
 
Gwendle
Ashley - Health Educator
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3 years ago 0 Ashley - Health Educator 1798 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Hi Coppersky,

I have never been diagnosed with depression but there were times in my life when I felt I struggled greatly with mood and anxiety.
 
You ask some really important questions. I think it is a good idea for you to think about these questions and weigh the pros and cons. I read this article when thinking about responding to you: http://www.theguardian.com/careers/careers-blog/mental-health-at-work. Maybe you will find it helpful in thinking about what you want to do?
 
I wish I could advise the perfect course of action for you but I am not quite sure what would be best. It sounds like you are doing a very good job of taking care of yourself and to me that would be a huge selling point. I think you have a lot to be confident about. Addressing mental health and health concerns takes dedication and hard work. What other strengths do you think you have gained in the process of working on your health?

Ashley, Health Educator
Coppersky
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3 years ago 0 Coppersky 3 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Thanks Ashley - I work in the human services so you would think these agencies would be supportive.  It hasn't been my experience so far.  Empathy towards the clients doesn't always translate to empathy towards staff.  Although i  understand that one has to be well to be able to provide support to other. i wouldn't be looking for work if i didn't feel/think i had my depression under control, with strategies to keep it that way including both CBT, mindfulness and involving myself in the arts.  Having both physical and mental health impairments is a bit of a double whammy. Just curious, Do you have depression?  In terms of the hiring process, When do you suggest disclosing?  How? I also have age playing against me now....triple whammy. help me counter the negative thought - why would an agency want to hire me....its a powerful one...I think i have evidence to counter it, but this attendance thing is the roughy. Truth is, i may need more time off work then the average person.  Do i just confront that concern head on? try and convince them i am still worth the risk??  when i am competing with younger, healthier candidates.....
Ashley - Health Educator
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3 years ago 0 Ashley - Health Educator 1798 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
Hi Coppersky,

That sounds like a tough situation. You are absolutely right, it is unfair that you may be judged for your attendance when you needed those days to work on your health. I think it is fantastic that you were proactive and have found good treatment. That in itself is a huge achievement!

It is hard to say what the best course of action is. You are right, to disclose or not to disclose? If the employer is informed about mental health and health then they should have no trouble understanding your situation and being confident in hiring you. However, not everyone is as informed around mental health as they should be; so, there is always the risk of being judged due to stigma and misunderstanding. Only you can decide what you feel comfortable with. You don't have to say anything. If you choose to say something you can say as much or as little as you want to. I am always biased towards being upfront and honest. Also, consider that the symptoms of ADD or your other health concern may pop up at any point. You might want your employer to be aware of this and perhaps even ensure that she has information and your conditions. Again, only you can decide what the right choice is for you.

Let us know what you decide to do and keep us updated.
 
Hang in there! Job searching can be so tough.  Ashley, Health Educator
Coppersky
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3 years ago 0 Coppersky 3 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo
hi there - a newbie with a dilemma. I want to get back to work, but my last few work experiences weren't, well, stellar.  Well, they weren't horrendous either, I did the work part fine, very well in some areas according to performance reviews, but i  just missed work a fair bit and put in a lot of overtime because of having difficulty concentrating when i was in attendance (i have ADD as well).  My employers said they would give me positive references but I have twice now gotten to the reference stage of interview processes , usually the "rubber stamp" from references, and not gotten hired. Although they won't tell me i suspect its because i don't have a reliable attendance record due to having to take time off work.  i only got the ADD diagnosis two yrs ago, along with another physical disorder (similar to MS) and  started a new treatment regime that is working pretty well for me now though so I am confident i won't run into these attendance issues again, but even so - is it fair to discriminate against me because my health may require me to actually use my sick time?  i didn't go over the limit in either case. - any advice on how to deal with this in the hiring process would be appreciated.  I guess its sort of a to disclose or not to disclose question as well. 

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