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Alcohol and Nutrient Deficiencies


3 months ago 0 11112 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0

That's great to read. Who doesn't want better skin and to feel better? Those are huge perks. I'm so glad you get to enjoy the positive results of quitting drinking. Nice work and thank you for sharing. Your results are motivating to read.

Thank you!

Ashley

3 months ago 0 332 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0

Ashley,

It’s amazing the changes I’ve experienced since I gave up drinking! Less than a year after I stopped people began to comment on my skin and how refreshed I looked. I can see a difference now when I look back at pictures. Isn’t it strange how we can look at ourselves in the mirror every day and not see our true selves?

So not only has there been a change visibility but a physical change as well. I gave up drinking when I was 49 years old. I am now 56 and feel better than I did at 46. I don’t exactly remember how I felt when I was 36, but I’m willing to bet that I feel better now than I did then too. As we know, alcohol makes us feel bad physically, and mentally. There is no doubt that giving up alcohol was the best decision I have ever made. I continue to experience positive changes and know there are more to come.  

Many thanks,

Lynn

3 months ago 0 11112 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0

Thanks for sharing your thoughts Lynn! I am so glad you're here.

I like how you said, "Sometimes you don't know how bad things are until they are better." This is so true. Have you noticed any visible changes to your health since quitting?

Take care,

Ashley

3 months ago +1 332 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1

I'm glad this thread was given a bump for us to revisit. I'm pretty sure that I read it during my drinking days. It was probably one that I dismissed because I didn't want to really read what it was saying. Who wants to read that we are mal-nourishing ourselves?

I have a science background, have been active all my life, and as I have grown older, concerned about my health. Sounds ridiculous now. I knew I was depriving my body, not of the things it wants, but the things it needs. I would consume half my calories from alcohol and somehow workout with weights and perform cardio exercise 5-6 days a week. Doctors would give me a clean bill of health, I was at a good weight and people commented on my physique and how healthy I was. Nobody, not even my friends or wife, had any idea of the true story.

Sometimes you don't know how bad things are until they are better. I'm better now and know the person I was was bad. If you are on this site, you can probably find a lot of truth in the original post. Reach out to the people here. You are not alone. I am proof this group of people can help you overcome what seems impossible.

Positive thoughts to everyone!

4 months ago 0 11112 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0

Bump!

This is an important thread to revisit.

8 years ago +1 345 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1
Excellent post Vincenze however was there not a big debate about taking calcium supplements not long ago? They found that it increased the potential for heart problems and heart attacks. It was also found that in order to properly absorb calcium and to have calcium go to where you wanted it like your bones, you needed to have sufficient amounts of K2 in your system otherwise the calcium would be deposited in random areas of your body. I stopped taking calcium supplements for these reasons and focus on foods (although not dairy) for my daily requirements. What's your take on this?
8 years ago +1 49 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1
Thanks Vincenza. I have been taking vitamins and calcium for a few months now. Happy New Year
8 years ago +1 1009 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 1
Great post Vincenza. Thanks for the insight!

8 years ago 0 1853 logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo logo 0
There are 3 basic nutritional components to food – protein, carbohydrate and fats. After being converted into simpler products by the body, they are what is used for fuel.

Many who drink alcohol heavily or regularly tend to ingest as much as 50% of their calories from alcohol. Unfortunately, this means that other important foods are neglected and heavy drinkers are often mal-nourished.

Alcohol interferes with the nutritional process by affecting digestion, storage, utilization and excretion of nutrients.

How does alcohol consumption do this?

· It inhibits the breakdown of nutrients by decreasing the amount of digestive enzymes in system
· It damages the cells lining the stomach and disables transport of some nutrients into the blood
· Nutritional deficiencies lead to further absorption problems
· It interferes with the body’s control of blood glucose levels 

Consequences?

Nutrients are essential for the body’s proper functioning – vitamins, minerals, proteins are the tools the body needs to perform properly. Heavy alcohol consumption disrupts this by creating nutritional deficiencies.

· Vitamins
o Alcohol impairs absorption and utilization of many vitamins, especially fat-soluble ones because fat absorption is disrupted. Therefore Vitamins A, E and D are absorbed improperly. Vitamin A deficiency is associated with night blindness and Vitamin D deficiency is associated with softening of the bones.
o Other vitamins such as Vitamins C, K and B vitamins are also deficient in heavy drinkers. These are necessary for tissue and wound repair and neurological function.
· Minerals
o Calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc deficiencies are common in individuals with problematic drinking. These occur due to poor fat absorption, increased urinary excretion, diarrhea and other absorption losses.

It may be a wise idea to take a daily multivitamin to correct these deficiencies. Eating well and hydrating often are also important habits to form.


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